National Diabetes Prevention Program 

Since the fall of 2012, AADE has been working as a grantee of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to increase access to and utilization of the National Diabetes Prevention Program and make participation in the program a reimbursable benefit. The National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is an evidence-based lifestyle change program which has been demonstrated to delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes among people at high risk. CDC funding was awarded to six organizations, all to help CDC reach the large number of people with prediabetes (those at high-risk for type 2 diabetes) by expanding the National DPP network or organization offering the program.

CDC Infographic 3 

Learn more about the National DPP grantees:

Program Targets of the National DPP

PreventT2 Program of the National Diabetes Prevention Program​

 Key Elements of the National DPP

The CDC's National Diabetes Prevention Program is an evidence-based behavioral change program, designed to support lifestyle balance, healthy eating, physical activity and exercise, and motivational support. The program is delivered by a trained Lifestyle Coach, who facilitate the CDC-approved curriculum and works to encourage and sustain group interaction so that participants support each other during the year-long program.

Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  facilitates the Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) and through this program, provides the quality assurance measures by which an organization demonstrates their ability to effectively deliver the Lifestyle Change Program. With various providers (in-person, virtual, or via distance learning), the DPRP provides equitable standards and operating guidelines that all providers follow in order to be fully recognized by the CDC.

What Can You Do?

National DPP - What Can You Do 
 
For more information on the National Diabetes Prevention Program, please visit the CDC's website at:  
http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention
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